Skepticism about science and medicine

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Adjuvants — the poisons hidden in some vaccines

Posted on 2019/03/12

Everyone knows that vaccines are ingeniously devised to work very precisely against certain unique threats, in particular to prevent infection by viruses. Preventing infection by a virus is especially important because there are no really satisfactory ways to cure a viral infection, whereas most bacterial infections can be treated quite successfully by means of antibiotics. […]

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Posted in legal considerations, media flaws, medical practices, prescription drugs | Leave a Comment »

Vaccination, HIV, and a reminder that we are all fallible

Posted on 2019/01/27

A favorite family stories: On a road trip in an unfamiliar country, I had taken a wrong turn that sent us tens of miles in a wrong direction. When I discovered that and confessed to my passengers, my nine-year-old daughter pointed out that “No one’s perfect, not even Daddy”. I was reminded of that once […]

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Posted in media flaws, medical practices, prescription drugs, science policy, unwarranted dogmatism in science | Leave a Comment »

HPV, Cochrane review, and the meaning of “cause”

Posted on 2018/10/27

HPV does not cause cervical cancer; HPV vaccination can be deadly mentions that Peter Gøtzsche had been expelled from the Cochrane Collaboration, causing some resignations from the Cochrane Board. For more about that, see what psychiatrist Peter Breggin has written about Gøtzsche: THE REFORM WORK OF PETER GØTZSCHE, MD and what Gøtzsche himself has written: […]

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Posted in media flaws, medical practices, prescription drugs, unwarranted dogmatism in science | Leave a Comment »

HPV does not cause cervical cancer; HPV vaccination can be deadly

Posted on 2018/09/16

Evidence continues to mount that the presumed connection between HPV and cervical cancer is no more than a statistical association, not a causative relationship: The Gardasil controversy: as reports of adverse effects increase, cervical cancer rates rise in HPV-vaccinated age groups  Annette Gartland “The Gardasil vaccines continue to be vaunted as life-saving, but there is […]

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Posted in conflicts of interest, fraud in medicine, fraud in science, medical practices, prescription drugs, unwarranted dogmatism in science | Leave a Comment »

HPV vaccines: risks exceed benefits

Posted on 2017/07/09

“Vaccination” is publicly argued in black/white, yes/no fashion, as though one had to be either for or against ALL vaccinations. But the fact is that the benefits of some vaccinations far outweigh the dangers of occasional harmful “side” effects whereas that is not clear with other vaccines. Polio vaccine, for example, seems to have been […]

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Posted in medical practices, prescription drugs, science policy, unwarranted dogmatism in science | 2 Comments »

Vaccines: The good, the bad, and the ugly

Posted on 2017/05/21

Only in recent years have I begun to wonder whether there are reasons not to follow official recommendations about vaccination. In the 1930s, I had the then-usual vaccinations, including (in Austria, perhaps Europe) against smallpox. A few others in later years when I traveled quite a bit. But the Andrew Wakefield affair *, and the […]

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Posted in fraud in medicine, legal considerations, medical practices, politics and science, prescription drugs, science is not truth, science policy, unwarranted dogmatism in science | 1 Comment »

Trust medical science at your peril: Correlations never prove causation

Posted on 2016/06/28

It was a long-known empirical fact that poverty, vagrancy, criminality, and apparently deficient intelligence all correlated with heredity to a considerable extent; they all ran in families and clans. The scientific confirmation that characteristics of animals are passed on from generation to generation, and the Darwin-Wallace explanation of evolution by natural selection of the fittest, […]

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Posted in conflicts of interest, consensus, media flaws, medical practices, prescription drugs | 5 Comments »

All vaccines are not the same; some are worse than useless

Posted on 2015/07/02

I am not among those who question the value of all vaccines on principle. I don’t doubt the value of vaccines in controlling smallpox, measles, polio. I do question the use of adjuvants and preservatives in vaccines, and I do think it makes sense to vaccinate babies against measles and the rest in single shots […]

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Posted in conflicts of interest, fraud in medicine, funding research, legal considerations, medical practices, politics and science, prescription drugs | 7 Comments »

NOVA’s vaccine propaganda: Media coverage

Posted on 2014/09/18

NOVA’s presentation on vaccination  was obviously one-sided, and a few observers noted as much: Verne Gay at Newsday recognized  the program to be “designed as an ironclad, insistent, well-reported film that, in the very nicest way possible, tells those who have decided not to vaccinate their children that they are — essentially — blithering idiots. […]

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Posted in conflicts of interest, legal considerations, media flaws, medical practices, prescription drugs, science policy | Leave a Comment »

NOVA on Vaccines: Documentary or Propaganda?

Posted on 2014/09/16

On Wednesday, 10 September 2014, PBS TV broadcast NOVA’s “Vaccines: Calling the Shots”.  It makes the case that everyone should be vaccinated and that doubts and worries about side effects are misplaced, originating with a tiny number of ideological “anti-vaxxers”. This program is propaganda, not a documentary: 1. Misdirection diverts attention from fundamental substantive points. […]

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Posted in media flaws, medical practices, science policy, unwarranted dogmatism in science | 9 Comments »